Yakama Nation Fisheries Projects

Industrial and agricultural pollution and toxic contamination, dams that block fish migration and access to spawning habitat—the decline of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey in the Columbia River is has many causes. To restore the river and the life that depends upon it, the Yakama Nation Fisheries is employing many and varied strategies, simultaneously. In some areas, habitat recovery is the key; in others, supplementation of salmon runs may need to be the driver.

Last updated: Thu, 08/29/2013

The proposed Goodfellow/Chotzen Floodplain Reconnection Project (Sunnyslope side channel) utilizes natural processes to restore floodpl

Last updated: Thu, 08/29/2013

Peshastin Reach Assessment identifies several potential projects in Peshastin Creek.

Last updated: Wed, 08/28/2013

This project created a logjam habitat feature to stabilize approximately 800 feet of eroding left bank on the Lower Wenatchee River.

Last updated: Wed, 08/28/2013

A Reach Assessment (RA) of the Lower White Pine Reach (LWP) of Nason Creek, Chelan County, WA was completed in 2009 by the USBR.

Last updated: Wed, 08/28/2013

In 2009, the Yakama Nation  procured field investigations and analyses for fish habitat project alternatives for Reach 3-D of the Entia

Last updated: Mon, 04/08/2013

 In July 1986, the Northwest Renewable Resources Center convened a conference in Port Ludlow to consider alternative dispute resolution for forest practices.

Last updated: Mon, 04/08/2013

Interior ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests of the Pacific Northwest have changed dramatically since the time of European settlement. As a result of decades of fire suppression and timber management that focused on selective removal

Last updated: Mon, 04/08/2013

The White-headed Woodpecker (Picoides albolarvatus) is uncommon and non-migratory throughout its geographic range in Washington, where it inhabits forests dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa).

Last updated: Wed, 03/06/2013

The Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) focuses on restoration, enhancement and protection of aquatic habitats in the Klickitat River and its tributaries to support native anadromous fish production.

Last updated: Wed, 03/06/2013

This project was implemented to assist in managing the migration of cattle from low elevations in the spring to higher elevations in the early summer.  Prior to the project, upon cattle turnout on May 1, cattle would quickly travel approximately 2